*Sigh*. My first great love. Happy Birthday, indeed!

greggorysshocktheater:

Happy Birthday Dame Diana Rigg, born July 20th 1938

(via polyhymnia)

Arrived today. I’ve been waiting for this one for a long time.

Arrived today. I’ve been waiting for this one for a long time.

zoetica:

Costumes for The Blue Bird at Stanislavski’s theater, 1908.

Oh, my, there’s some nightmare fuel there.

(Source: mistgates, via tarstarkasnet)

"Godzilla wanted to avoid this."

"Godzilla wanted to avoid this."

(Source: comicscans, via comicbookcovers)

sunsetgun:

Happy Mother’s Day!

(via mudwerks)

cinephilearchive:

This gripping envelope-pusher, the most popular film by Hollywood provocateur Otto Preminger, was groundbreaking for the frankness of its discussion of sex—but more than anything else, it is a striking depiction of the power of words. Featuring an outstanding supporting cast—with a young George C. Scott as a fiery prosecutor and the legendary attorney Joseph N. Welch as the judge—and an influential score by Duke Ellington, ‘Anatomy of a Murder’ is an American movie landmark, nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Put Criterion’s 600th spine number on your shelf, you will be glad you did.
“‘Anatomy of a Murder’ is Preminger at his finest—intelligent, intricate, utterly unillusioned, and evenhanded. By the late fifties, he was a director second only to Hitchcock as a Hollywood public figure. At the same time, rumors circulated about his spectacular rudeness and his bullying treatment of actors, especially less experienced actors. This highly intelligent man was capable of grabbing a young performer by the shoulders and screaming ‘Relax! Relax!’ into his face. ‘Sort of a Jewish Nazi,’ Joan Crawford called him, and she was a fan.” —Balance Of Terror: How Otto Preminger made his movies by David Denby
The following videos are required viewing for every aspiring director.




Speaking of the power of words, here’s Wendell Mayes’ screenplay for ‘Anatomy of a Murder.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

This gripping envelope-pusher, the most popular film by Hollywood provocateur Otto Preminger, was groundbreaking for the frankness of its discussion of sex—but more than anything else, it is a striking depiction of the power of words. Featuring an outstanding supporting cast—with a young George C. Scott as a fiery prosecutor and the legendary attorney Joseph N. Welch as the judge—and an influential score by Duke Ellington, ‘Anatomy of a Murder’ is an American movie landmark, nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Put Criterion’s 600th spine number on your shelf, you will be glad you did.

“‘Anatomy of a Murder’ is Preminger at his finest—intelligent, intricate, utterly unillusioned, and evenhanded. By the late fifties, he was a director second only to Hitchcock as a Hollywood public figure. At the same time, rumors circulated about his spectacular rudeness and his bullying treatment of actors, especially less experienced actors. This highly intelligent man was capable of grabbing a young performer by the shoulders and screaming ‘Relax! Relax!’ into his face. ‘Sort of a Jewish Nazi,’ Joan Crawford called him, and she was a fan.” —Balance Of Terror: How Otto Preminger made his movies by David Denby

The following videos are required viewing for every aspiring director.

Speaking of the power of words, here’s Wendell Mayes’ screenplay for ‘Anatomy of a Murder.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

truefoes:

Seven Samurai (dir. Akira Kurosawa — 1954)

truefoes:

Seven Samurai (dir. Akira Kurosawa — 1954)

(via omercifulheaves)

comicbookcovers:

Crime Detective Comics #2, June 1950, cover by Dan Zolnerowich

comicbookcovers:

Crime Detective Comics #2, June 1950, cover by Dan Zolnerowich

cinephilearchive:

J.J. Abrams on Rod Serling, “The reason we are still talking about Rod Serling is that he knew how to write the kind of pieces that were anything but disposable. They were widely entertaining and deeply meaningful and some of the best work I have ever seen on television.” This is beyond brilliant — Rod Serling speaking at UCLA 11/11/1966 and 5/17/1971. From the archives of the UCLA Communications Studies Department. Digitized 2013. “Mind blown when at 48:28 the kid he’s mentioning is, in fact, George Lucas.”


See also: “In 1970 University of Kansas professor James Gunn interviewed a series of science fiction authors for his Centron film series ‘Science Fiction in Literature.’ This footage from an unreleased film in that series featuring an interview with Rod Serling, which wasn’t finished due to problems with obtaining rights to show footage from Serling’s work in television. This reconstruction is based on the original workprint footage that was saved on two separate analog sources since the audio track was separate. Re-syncing the footage was a long involved process as the audio track didn’t match the film and there was substantial sync drift. While not perfect, there’s a lot of interesting information on writing for television in the dialogue with Serling as well as a prophetic statement about his health at the beginning.” —Joel Sanderson

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//

cinephilearchive:

J.J. Abrams on Rod Serling, “The reason we are still talking about Rod Serling is that he knew how to write the kind of pieces that were anything but disposable. They were widely entertaining and deeply meaningful and some of the best work I have ever seen on television.” This is beyond brilliant — Rod Serling speaking at UCLA 11/11/1966 and 5/17/1971. From the archives of the UCLA Communications Studies Department. Digitized 2013. “Mind blown when at 48:28 the kid he’s mentioning is, in fact, George Lucas.”

See also: “In 1970 University of Kansas professor James Gunn interviewed a series of science fiction authors for his Centron film series ‘Science Fiction in Literature.’ This footage from an unreleased film in that series featuring an interview with Rod Serling, which wasn’t finished due to problems with obtaining rights to show footage from Serling’s work in television. This reconstruction is based on the original workprint footage that was saved on two separate analog sources since the audio track was separate. Re-syncing the footage was a long involved process as the audio track didn’t match the film and there was substantial sync drift. While not perfect, there’s a lot of interesting information on writing for television in the dialogue with Serling as well as a prophetic statement about his health at the beginning.” —Joel Sanderson

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Lovely, lovely French posters!

nevver:

French Movie Posters of the Week

Of course!
ourvaluedcustomers:

While discussing his underappreciated genius…

Of course!

ourvaluedcustomers:

While discussing his underappreciated genius…

comicbookcovers:

Unexpected #202, September 1980, cover by Luis Domiguez

comicbookcovers:

Unexpected #202, September 1980, cover by Luis Domiguez

tragedyseries:

Have you considered the possibility that your best friend, neighbor, room mate, sibling or dear old parents might slip suddenly towards the macabre? Try your hand at the whimsical practice of super-villain phrenology; it’s our best testing method aside from testing their blood for phlogiston…

You will need access to a printing mechanism, shears, some adhesive paste and 5 uninterrupted minutes. I wish you the best of luck.

One of these things is not like the others, one of these things just doesn’t belong…

One of these things is not like the others, one of these things just doesn’t belong…

  archive